Periodicals Collection

Highlights - Full sets

 

The Library's collection of periodicals has many unique items, including full sets of several major journals. The online catalogue will indicate which journal titles the Library holds and from which years. Please note that some of these titles may have undergone several name changes in their long history and today some are also available as e-journals. Full sets of both current and out-of-print titles in the collection include:

    

Current titles   

Architectural Design

The Imperial Hotel, Tokyo

This drawing of the Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, appeared in the first issue of 'Architectural Design & Construction'

Copyright: RIBA Library Drawings and Archives Collections

Architects' Journal

Architects’ Journal

The earliest copies of the 'Builders' Journal' and the latest 'Architects' Journals' in the Library's collections

    
   

First issue: November 1930

Published first as 'Architectural Design & Construction', it was renamed 'Architectural Design' when Monica Pidgeon became the editor in 1947. Every two months the magazine takes a particular theme and its articles debate some of the latest theoretical aspects in architecture.

First issue: 12 February 1895

This magazine began as the 'Builders' Journal' and underwent several name changes until it became the 'Architects' Journal' in 1919. Each week the AJ includes detailed building studies and the latest news on the built environment.

 

Architectural Review

Architectural Review

The earliest and latest Architectural Reviews in the Library's collections
   

Builder/Building

Builder and Building

The earliest and latest copies of Builder/Building from the Library's collections

First issue: November 1896

The sister publication to the AJ, every month this visually led magazine covers current issues in architecture and features in-depth building studies. The first issue was meant as 'a magazine for the artist, archaeologist, designer and craftsman'.

First issue: December 1842

For over 150 years, and after its renaming in 1966 to 'Building', 'The Builder' has reported on all aspects of the construction industry.  

 

Country Life

Country Life

Material in the Library covering over one hundred years of Country Life

RIBA Journal

RIBA Journal

The latest copies of RIBA Journal in the Library

First issue: 8 January 1897 

This weekly magazine focuses on rural life, which began with the aim to being 'THE Journal for all interested in Country Life and Country Pursuits'. Architecture features regularly, with articles on country houses appearing from the first issue. Today it continues to look at architecture as an important part of the rural landscape. 

First issue (3rd series): November 1893

The RIBA Journal is the magazine of the RIBA and as well as reporting on news at the institute, also reports on trends, with analysis of topical issues in architecture and features on architectural practices.  

 

Out-of-print titles

Academy Architecture

Academy Architecture

'Academy Architecture and Annual Architecture Review': First edition (above left) and last edition (Below left)

Architecture Illustrated

Architecture Illustrated

The first (top left) and last (top right)editions of 'Architecture Illustrated'
  

First issue: 1889
Last issue: 1931

The focus of 'Academy Architecture and Annual Architecture Review' was primarily the buildings of Great Britain, but there were illustrations of buildings from across the British Empire and mainland Europe. Carrying little text, this publication was notable for carrying mainly illustrations - initially drawings and etchings in early editions, which were increasingly replaced by photographs in the early 20th century.

Just before the journal ceased publication in 1931, Architecture Illustrated began publication. Both titles had their editorial and advertising offices at the same address, 44 Doughty Street, London.

First issue: June 1930
Last issue: December 1957

'Architecture Illustrated' was, according to its first edition: 'founded to meet the needs of a busy profession.' By relying on primarily images, the magazine's early aim was to inform through visual means, using text only to convey information about materials and – since this monthly publication carried only black and white images – colour. It covered predominantly British buildings.

Of particular interest are the full-page illustrated advertisements for various architectural products and industries, such as concrete, flooring, steelwork, tiles and sanitation.

 

Civil Engineer

Civil Engineer & Architect’s Journal

Early editions of the 'Civil Engineer & Architect’s Journal'

L’Architecture Vivante

L’Architecture Vivante

Bound copies of 'L’Architecture Vivante'
   

First issue: October 1837
Last issue: December 1867

For 30 years the 'Civil Engineer & Architect’s Journal' recorded in detail some of the technological, scientific and engineering advancements of the mid-19th century in Britain and rest of the world, and how they influenced the work of architects in that period.

Amongst the subjects covered are railways, bridges, restorations, housing and roads. Consisting mainly of text, some articles carry illustrations.

First issue: 1923
Last issue: 1933

A total of 21 issues of 'L’Architecture Vivante' were published. It features buildings and projects from across the world, in particular Europe and the Soviet Union, by architects such as Alvaar Alto, Le Corbusier, Theo van Doesburg, Tony Garnier, Eileen Grey and Henri Sauvage.

Many examples of Modernism, contemporary construction techniques and city planning can be found in this French journal.

 

L’Esprit Nouveau

L’Esprit Nouveau

Bound copies of 'L’Esprit Nouveau'

 

First issue: October 1920
Last issue: January 1925

'L’Esprit Nouveau' was a short-lived French publication, but one which has a special place in the history of Modernism. The journal carried illustrated, polemical essays on art and culture. Amongst the contributors were Le Corbusier, Paul Dermée, Adolf Loos, Amadée Ozenfant and Giuseppe Ungaretti. Their writings disseminated influential theories that were to inform some of the ideals of Modernism.

  

 

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