The Palazzo Thiene and the Villa Thiene

Conservation: sheets XIV/4 and VIII/7

 

 

Detail of Roman tombs

transparent-magnifying-glass-r Enlarge image

Detail of tear and historical repair

VIII/7, Roman tombs by Andrea Palladio (c1540)

RIBA Library Drawings Collection

Detail of historical repair

transparent-magnifying-glass-r Enlarge image

Detail of tear and historical repair under transmitted light

VIII/7, Roman tombs by Andrea Palladio (c1540)

RIBA Library Drawings Collection

Weak areas of sheet XIV/4 were treated and repaired and any loose fibres were consolidated. The drawing was inlaid with a suitable paper to ensure that both the recto and verso image could be viewed.

To reduce the risk of the drawing touching the UV filtered plexi glass whilst being exhibited, 5mm fillets were placed inside the frame.

Historical repairs

Photographs made through normal light and transmitted light can highlight how heavy historical repairs can be compared to the weight of the original paper.

This can be seen in the example of the detail of sheet VIII/7 shown here. Transmitted light also highlights the extent of the damage caused by animal glue both on the repair and along all edges of the paper, all appearing very dark.

It is not unusual to find wide strips of paper on the back of older drawings that have been used to repair them, causing major distortions to the sheet. This type of repair is very crude, does not age well, causes heavy planar distortions and in many cases has to be removed.

Paper repairs should be both functional and discreet. Toning the repair paper to make it look similar to the original is not uncommon. All new repairs made for the Palladio collection were made on the reverse side using Japanese paper and adhered with wheat starch paste, as can be seen in the conservation of sheets III/7 and III/8.