Ages of Substrate

The Photography of Gerald McLean

Gerald McLean, one of a number of photographers who share their images with RIBApix, was uniquely privileged to have worked for the renowned architectural photographer John Maltby (1910-1980). In this feature we explore how working for Maltby influenced his own future career as a photographer to the extent of even recreating Maltby’s logo for his own use and with aspirations that it might become an internationally recognised symbol for photographers.

After a succession of aptitude and ability tests and nearing the end of his secondary school education Gerald McLean was offered an apprenticeship in electronic engineering. This may well have been the smart choice, given the advances in computing and all things electronic. Yet having spent the summer exploring silver halide in the darkroom created for him in the garage by his father and elder brothers, he made a lifelong commitment to devote himself to creating a world of his own composition.

Gerald recalls that, “Once I realised that photography occupied the majority of my thoughts and efforts, having first been introduced to the art form at school aged 14, I found my way to the offices of John Maltby Ltd. who offered an apprenticeship in photography. Thus, my journey began.

“The first place it led was to a poorly illuminated and cold storage area where I spent the first three months of my apprenticeship going through all of John’s glass plate negatives. Checking their condition, rewashing, renumbering, re-sleeving and removing those that were broken or beyond repair.  Who would have known that I was saving them for the RIBA Collections?

“As it turns out, looking at thousands of black & white negatives is an extremely good way to hone your sense of composition and lighting. I suspect this was John’s intention all along.”

Although John Maltby Ltd. was a commercial studio covering a wide variety of subjects, Gerald’s main focus centred on architecture. An article for ‘Kodak’ magazine in 1991 summed up his work, Gerald's choice of architecture as his specialized subject was determined by his apprenticeship to architectural photographer John Maltby and his desire to portray that which he perceives to be constructive in our lives - both literal and abstract. Architecture; and the elements from which it is composed provide Gerald with the ideal subject with which to transform those elements into salient pictorial form. In experimenting with the new shapes that presented themselves, he has realized artistic confidence controlling the fundamentals of architectural form; line, mass, space and proportion. International assignments have helped Gerald to photograph buildings from unusual standpoints; to stress those aspects, which communicate the driving aesthetic behind each building to the viewer, without losing the integrity of the architect’s design.”

As photography celebrates its 180th year and with no more glass plate negatives for him to refer to, it is now the revolutionary progress of the camera and its electronics leading to rapid changes in substrates and methodology that ensures Gerald remains a student of the art. Indeed, this is also akin to the advances that he has witnessed in the field of architecture and building practices in particular recalling that, “When I finally advanced to being trusted alone on location and got a driving licence, I was given a building progress assignment. At that time buildings in England were still primarily constructed of bricks. Now bricks are mainly used for decorative purposes, if at all.”

As a personal project, Gerald has created a record of these contemporary building methods and practices during the regeneration of Greenwich Peninsular by Knight Dragon and in time we hope that many of these images and videos will be available through RIBApix. He has also published a book on his time working in Oman, ‘taSauwur: Sultanate of Oman’ and has another entitled ‘Grace – in this place’ of photomontages based on the daydreams of his mother, due for publication in the autumn of 2019.

To see more of Gerald McLean’s work on RIBApix click here

 

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RIBA3718Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

 
RIBA3719John Ruskin

 
RIBA3720Frank Lloyd Wright


RIBA3721Owen Jones

 
RIBA3722Christ Church, Spitalfields, London, seen from Brushfield Street

 
RIBA3723St Stephen Walbrook, City of London


RIBA3724Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire: the south (entrance) front

 
RIBA3725St Stephen Walbrook, City of London: distant view of the steeple

 
RIBA3726Royal Institute of British Architects, 66 Portland Place, London: the library


RIBA372737 Bidston Road, Oxton, Birkenhead, Merseyside: the dining room

 
RIBA3728Tricorn Shopping Centre, Portsmouth, Hampshire: the vehicle ramp at the west corner of site

 
RIBA3729Tricorn Shopping Centre, Portsmouth, Hampshire: the front along Market Way


RIBA3734Seagram Building, 375 Park Avenue, New York

 
RIBA3735World Trade Center, New York

 
RIBA3736House of the Future, Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition, Olympia, London: the sitting room


RIBA3737Design for the sitting room of penthouse flat, 26 Broadwalk House, 51 Hyde Park Gate, London

 
RIBA3738Odeon cinema, Fortis Green Road, Muswell Hill, London: the ticket booth

 
RIBA3740House of the Future, Daily Mail Ideal Home Exhibition, Olympia, London: the kitchen


RIBA3741Architect's home, Rungsted Kyst

 
RIBA3742Wildwood, Princes Drive, Oxshott, Surrey: the living room and hall

 
RIBA3743Wildwood, Princes Drive, Oxshott, Surrey: the kitchen


RIBA37441 Royal Crescent, Bath

 
RIBA3745Chrysler Building, 405 Lexington Avenue, New York: close-up of the steel-clad pinnacle

 
RIBA3746Forte's Crescent Restaurant, Festival of Britain, Festival Pleasure Gardens, Battersea, London


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