Ocean Liners

Ocean Liners: Getting there is half the fun!

Images of four ocean liners from the RIBA Collections

Prior to the arrival of the “jet age” and, in particular, the commercial success of the Boeing 707 “airliner” ocean liners were the dominant mode of transport between continents not only carrying passengers but freight and mail. Today only Cunard’s Queen Mary 2 (QM2) continues that line’s advertising slogan of “Getting there is half the fun!” Indeed the QM2 is now the sole ship in service as an ocean liner albeit not exclusively as she is also used as a cruise ship.

Ocean liners and cruise ships are actually different types of vessels. Ocean liners have regular ocean going routes and being built for the open oceans tend to be stronger, faster and sleeker. In comparison cruise ships tend to be much boxier being largely designed to cruise around the calmer sailing conditions of sheltered waters.

Only a handful of ocean liners now survive, including the SS Great Britain (1843), RMS Queen Mary (1934), SS United States (1951), SS Queen Elizabeth 2 or QE2 (1967) as well as a couple, MV Astoria (built as the Stockholm, 1946) and MS Marco Polo (1964), now plying their trade as cruise liners.

Illustrated here are a number of photographs and drawings of ocean liners from the RIBA Collections including several with interior designs by renowned architects including those for the RMS Queen Elizabeth by the designer of the RIBA headquarters, George Grey Wornum.

Feature by Jonathan Makepeace.

SS Normandie
Ocean Liners

SS Normandie

Click on the image above to go to the Normandie gallery.

RMS Orion & RMS Orcades II
Ocean Liners

Orion & Orcades II

Click on the image above to got to go to the Orion & Orcades gallery.

SS Oriana
Ocean Liners

SS Oriana

Click on the image above to go to the Oriana gallery.

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105521 items
`RIBA105882Rolling Bridge, Paddington Basin, London: the bridge rolled up

 
RIBA2088Hillfield (House A), Whipsnade Zoo Estate, Whipsnade: the sun-catch

 
RIBA2093Fagus factory, Alfeld an der Leine, Lower Saxony


RIBA2187Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, Hong Kong: first banking level reception area and atrium above

 
RIBA2478Battersea 'A' Power Station, London, by night

 
RIBA3066Designs for six circular badges showing birds


RIBA3067Designs for six circular badges showing flowers

 
RIBA3068Designs for six circular badges showing animals

 
RIBA3069Designs for six circular badges showing animals and flowers


RIBA3070Designs for six circular badges showing sea creatures and birds

 
RIBA3085Design for a beach house, California, for Rupert R. Ryan

 
RIBA3086Design for the river front of St Olaf House, Hay's Wharf, Tooley Street, Southwark, London


RIBA3091Design for the Odeon cinema, Leicester Square, London

 
RIBA3093Design for the interior of Fischer's Restaurant, New Bond Street, London

 
RIBA3316Unexecuted design for Frinton Hotel, Frinton-on-Sea, Essex


RIBA3318Marine Court, St Leonards on Sea, East Sussex

 
RIBA3716Ronan Point, Clever Road, West Ham, London, after building collapse

 
RIBA3717Central Market Building, Covent Garden, London


RIBA3718Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

 
RIBA3719John Ruskin

 
RIBA3720Frank Lloyd Wright


RIBA3721Owen Jones

 
RIBA3722Christ Church, Spitalfields, London, seen from Brushfield Street

 
RIBA3723St Stephen Walbrook, City of London


RIBA3724Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire: the south (entrance) front

 
RIBA3725St Stephen Walbrook, City of London: distant view of the steeple

 
RIBA3726Royal Institute of British Architects, 66 Portland Place, London: the library


RIBA12953Plan of Nottingham Castle

 
RIBA64332Berkeley Library, Trinity College, Dublin: students relaxing on the raked concrete benches by the east front entrance

 
RIBA64334Berkeley Library, Trinity College, Dublin: the entrance hall


RIBA84028Plan of Nottingham Castle

 
RIBA84030View of Nottingham Castle with gabled houses and a church at the bottom of the hill

 
RIBA84031View of the north face of Nottingham Castle: elevation


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