RMS Orion & RMS Orcades II: Modern Liners

Described in the Architectural Review as “a landmark in the evolution of the modern liner”, Orion (1934) and her sister ship Orcades II (1937) were built for the Orient Line. Orion’s design was a departure from the more usual period styles to a simpler, contemporary style. With modern interiors designed by Brian O’Rorke this was the first time that an architect had carried out the entire decoration of a ship. Designed primarily for tropical conditions they featured air conditioning in all public rooms and a more flexible, informal, open air layout.

Both ships were converted to troopships in the Second World War. Sadly in 1942 Orcades was sunk with the loss of 45 lives south west of Cape Town after a battle with a German U-boat in which she was hit by 6 torpedoes.

 

RMS Orion

Launched:  Barrow-in-Furness, 1934

Disposal:  scrapped, 1963

Tonnage:  23,696 tons

Length:  665 feet or 203 metres

Maximum speed:  21 knots

 

RMS Orcades II

Launched:  Barrow-in-Furness, 1937

Disposal:  sunk, 1942

Tonnage:  23,456 tons

Length:  639 feet or 195 metres

Maximum speed:  21 knots

 

Also see: Ocean LinersSS NormandieSS Oriana.

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RIBA116548Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield

 
RIBA116549Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the reception area

 
RIBA116550Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the open-plan office


RIBA116551Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the open-plan office

 
RIBA116552Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the open-plan office

 
RIBA116553Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the reception desk


RIBA116554Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield

 
RIBA116555Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the glazed window into the offices

 
RIBA116556Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the main entrance at night


RIBA116557Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the main staircase

 
RIBA116558Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the reception area

 
RIBA116559Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the open-plan office


RIBA116560Building Design Partnership offices, Sheffield: the reception desk

 
RIBA116561Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the central seating area

 
RIBA116562Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London


RIBA116563Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: one of the mirrored alcoves

 
RIBA116564Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: one of the mirrored alcoves

 
RIBA116565Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the servery


RIBA116566Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the curved seating

 
RIBA116567Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the curved seating

 
RIBA116568Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London


RIBA116569Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the central seating area

 
RIBA116570Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the central seating area

 
RIBA116571Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London


RIBA116572Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: one of the mirrored alcoves

 
RIBA116573Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: one of the mirrored alcoves

 
RIBA116574Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the servery


RIBA116575Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the curved seating

 
RIBA116576Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the curved seating

 
RIBA116577Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London


RIBA116578Coffee shop, Tate Gallery, London: the central seating area

 
RIBA116579Thorney Court, Palace Gate, Kensington, London, with the gate pier from the earlier block in the foreground

 
RIBA116580Thorney Court, Palace Gate, Kensington, London: the front elevation


RIBA116581Thorney Court, Palace Gate, Kensington, London: the main entrance incorporating the original gate piers from the earlier blcok

 
RIBA116582Thorney Court, Palace Gate, Kensington, London: the rear elevation

 
RIBA116583Thorney Court, Palace Gate, Kensington, London, with one of the original gate piers of the earlier block in the foreground