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Creative Writing Workshop: Building Stories
​John Donat / RIBA Collections
Workshops

Creative Writing Workshop: Building Stories

​Develop your poetry and prose, and learn how sensory responses to our built environment can inform narrative, character development, and plot in your writing.

Explore the connections between our built environment and our imagination. On this weekend creative writing course, you’ll use the experience of our public and private spaces to inspire strong, evocative fiction.

Led by award-winning writers and Birkbeck tutors, you’ll develop skills in both poetry and prose writing, and learn how sensory responses to our environment can inform narrative, character development, and plot in your writing.

Over two days we’ll tackle the fundamentals of good storytelling, looking at constructing characters, developing conflict, choosing point of view and discovering the power of secrets. We’ll learn from architectural practice, studying blueprints and how to read particular buildings, to help us explore the surprising links between architectural and story structures.

This course is led by Zoe Gilbert and Lily Dunn, London Lit Lab’s co-founders and creative writing tutors. Zoe Gilbert is an award-winning short story writer (Folk, forthcoming, Bloomsbury), and Lily Dunn is a writer of novels (Shadowing the Sun, Portobello) and creative non-fiction (Granta). With special guest Julia Bell, writer and Course Director of the MA Creative Writing at Birkbeck, author of three novels and co-editor of the bestselling Creative Writing Coursebook.

A collaboration between Birkbeck, University of London, the British Library and the RIBA.

RIBA Members should book the Member rate.

Please note that this event takes place at the RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London W1B 1AD on Saturday and at the British Library, 96 Euston Rd, Kings Cross, London NW1 2DB on Sunday.

This event is part of the Pablo Bronstein: Conservatism, or the Long Reign of Pseudo-Georgian Architecture exhibition.