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Guy's & St Thomas' East Wing Cladding RIBA Competition

East Wing Cladding

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​​Hopkins Architects
Competition | Past

​Guy's & St Thomas' East Wing Cladding

The East Wing building is a significant urban presence in the London cityscape. Situated on the south side of the river where the Thames meanders north, the East Wing sits opposite the Houses of Parliament, with Lambeth Palace to the south. To the east, the façade is clearly visible to trains arriving at Waterloo station.

Invited Education and Health

Hopkins Architects and ISG were the winning team in the competition for the re-cladding of a 13-storey tower building on the St Thomas’ Hospital site in central London.

The competition sought teams with the capacity and imagination to design and deliver a scheme that would enhance the Trust’s reputation for healthcare provision and its landmark status in London. At the same time, the design needed to address existing fabric issues. The East Wing building has a significant presence on the London skyline and the competition sought to achieve a re-cladding design of exemplary quality befitting its prominent location within the city.

Architects and contractors were required to collaborate from day one, and the competition followed a multi-stage process. At the final stage teams were invited to come up with design concepts that would provide a re-cladding solution for the building that would also enhance the internal environment by addressing water ingress, improve insulation and increase energy efficiency.

The Hopkins/ISG winning design is a single skin of glass, with a timber mullion and stainless steel external pressure cap, which creates a thermal buffer zone and two new triangular atria. The judges thought this to be a thorough and well thought through proposal with the potential to achieve a significant transformation in the image of the hospital, both externally and internally with generous atria spaces which would enhance the experience for patients and staff.

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