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​RIBA Stirling Prize shortlist: the models
Exhibitions

RIBA Stirling Prize shortlist: the models

See the six models from RIBA Striling Prize shortlisted practices: Amin Taha + Groupwork, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, Reiach & Hall Architects and Michael Laird Architects, Baynes & Mitchell Architects, dRMM Architects and 6a architects.

Everyone loves a good model, especially when they are of some of the best new buildings in the UK.

Some models are created for presentation while others are integral to the design process. Each model tells a different story and serves a different purpose; from illustrating how a building relates to its immediate environment, to demonstrating a construction technique or the way light will filter through the space.

See the six models from RIBA Striling Prize shortlisted practices: Amin Taha + Groupwork, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, Reiach & Hall Architects and Michael Laird Architects, Baynes & Mitchell Architects, dRMM Architects and 6a architects.

About the RIBA Stirling Prize

635 schemes entered the RIBA, RIAS, RSAW and RSUA Awards this year. A small army of juries around the country assess and visit the projects to identify Regional and National winners. In assessing a building, each jury is invited to balance a range of factors, including local context, budget, sustainability and user experience. Documentary evidence and photographs are important, of course, but more so the visits, which give Juries the chance to experience and appreciate first-hand what each project has to offer.

The six buildings that reach the Stirling shortlist will each have been visited three times by distinguished juries over the course of seven months. Choosing from the final six should never be easy, but it is important that the stories they tell, the challenges that their architects have overcome and the response of their users and clients is fully understood by the jury who must make the difficult decision of identifying the Stirling Prize winner.